Conference and Show field trips offer real-world learning opportunities, camaraderie

National Auctioneers Association members and other attendees can break away from the JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis during Conference and Show to learn more about auctions, government, automobile racing and appraising masterpieces.

Attendees have the opportunity to venture out July 17-18 for these field trips:

Traveling Tour: Christy’s Auction House

Auctioneer sellingEach Wednesday, Christy’s Auction House puts on a general consignment auction that attracts 1,400 people, spans four buildings and includes five auction teams. During the trip, attendees will learn the ins and outs of setup for the event.

“The greatest benefit for those on this tour will be seeing and learning about the general logistics of running an auction house on a weekly basis,” says Jack Christy, CAI, BAS, CES, MPPA.

Christy owns Christy’s of Indiana, Indianapolis, which includes the auction house. The business began 38 years ago and has been in its current location for 18 years.

Those on the tour will learn about aspects of the weekly auction, including how the auction house schedules various items. Many consigned items have assigned auction times.

Walking Tour: Learn How to Work with Your State Representative

As a state senator, Dennis Kruse, CAI, of Kruse & Associates in Auburn, Ind., spends a good chunk of time in the Indiana State Capitol — just three blocks away from Conference and Show at the JW Marriott.

“It makes sense for me to combine my two backgrounds for a group interested in learning more about state and national government,” Kruse says of the trip he’ll lead at the Indiana State Capitol.

Kruse plans to give NAA members a tour of the building and speak with attendees on topics including how to effectively communicate with elected officials, how a legislative bill is created, how the bill becomes law, and how public policy affects Auctioneers and their businesses.

He also would like for the group to sit in on a legislative session.

“Hopefully people will leave with a better sense of the best way to work with their elected officials back home,” Kruse says.

Traveling Tour: Indy 500 Museum

Attendees also have the opportunity to see a facility touted as one of the most highly visible museums in the world devoted to automobiles and auto racing.

The trip to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame will feature a tour of the warehouse in the building’s basement. The behind-the-scenes tour will include a look at cars that are in the process of being restored, versus cars on display in the general portion of the museum.

Dick Whittington, CAI, MPPA, of Whittington Auction & Appraisal LLC in Wilkesboro, N.C., is organizing the trip. He is an expert vintage car appraiser and has visited the museum several times in the past as a racing enthusiast. He says the trip will be enjoyable for auto appraisers and race fans alike.

“With a bunch of people with like interests going, there will be great camaraderie and a lot of fun,” Whittington says.

Walking Tour: How to Appraise Museum Quality Art & Antiques

Jane Campbell-Chambliss, CAI, AARE, CES, MPPA, says she hopes to hone attendees’ eyes for fine arts during a trip to the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Campbell-Chambliss, of Jane Campbell-Chambliss & Associates LLC in Annapolis, Md., has appraised more than 50 masterpieces in her 35 years appraising fine art, and she says it takes time to perfect the craft.

During the tour, she says she will stress the 14 points of connoisseurship — aspects such as design, age, detail and condition — while also evaluating museum pieces during the tour.

“You have to look at every piece the same way,” Campbell-Chambliss says. “Remember that the devil is in the details.”

Her strategy isn’t only for Auctioneers appraising masterpieces.

“If I am doing a household appraisal, I’m still using that connoisseurship eye,” she says.

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Filed under Auction Industry, Auctioneer magazine, Conference and Show, Education, NAA Members

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